COMPASS Wednesday

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COMPASS Wednesday
COMPASS WEDNESDAY

Combined OCE MPO ATM Seminar Series

SPRING 2019
Wednesdays at 3:00 pm, Seminar Room SLAB 103

Jan 16: NO SEMINAR

Jan 23: Dr. Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami

Structural Morphology and Dialectic Form Finding of Coastal Structures

Structural morphology refers to the study of form and shape in structures as well as the relations between form, forces, and material. Dialectic form finding reflects an extension of the traditional form-finding process integrating performance-related constraints and criteria in the exploration of a geometry in static equilibrium with a prescribed load. Although structural morphology and form finding have been investigated for civil and aerospace engineering applications resulting in materially and mechanically efficient structures, their potential in coastal engineering applications has yet to be accomplished. The talk will discuss structural morphology and form finding in civil and coastal engineering structures through a series of projects and examples.

Jan 30: Lisa Bucci
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, RSMAS
(one-hour ATM student seminar)

Feb 06: Dr. Matthias Morzfeld
Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona

Should I Really Use a Localized Particle Filter?

I will first review particle filters (PF) as a tool for nonlinear / non-Gaussian data assimilation, describe how PFs fail when the dimension is large and how this can be fixed by localization. An interesting next question is: Are (localized) PFs really "better" than ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) or variational methods? I will provide partial answers to this question by considering simplified data assimilation problems in which the degree of nonlinearity can be controlled to be mild, medium, or strong. My main conclusions are that PFs should only be used when nonlinearity is strong and that variational methods and smoothers can outperform EnKFs and PFs in the regime of mild nonlinearity. This is joint work with Daniel Hodyss, Marine Meteorology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California.

Feb 13: Dr. Joseph Prospero
Professor Emeritus, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, RSMAS

Sixty Years of African Dust Research at RSMAS:
A Personal History of Its Evolution and a Look to the Future

Feb 20: Dr. Yana Bebieva
Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute, Florida State University

Double-Diffusive Layering in the Arctic Ocean:
An Explanation of Along-Layer Temperature and Salinity Gradients

A type of ocean mixing process, double-diffusive convection, gives rise to layers in the Arctic Ocean that may be characterized by their differing temperature and salinity properties. The properties and physics of these layers are key to understanding how heat is transported vertically and laterally in the Arctic Ocean. A theoretical formalism is put forward to explain distinct features of the layers that are characterized in the Ice-Tethered Profiler observations. The physical framework in context with observations brings new understanding to how the layers form, and how they relate to heat and salt transport in the Arctic Ocean.

Feb 27: Dr. Joellen Russell
University of Arizona

Mar 06: Dr. Jacob Scheff
UNC Charlotte

Mar 13: Mariana Bernardi Bif
Department of Ocean Sciences, RSMAS
(one-hour OCE student seminar)

Mar 20: NO COMPASS SEMINAR (Rosenstiel Award week)

Mar 27: Dr. Brian Arbic
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Apr 03: Dr. Margaret Leinen, 2019 Distinguished Lecturer
Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Apr 10: Rachel Zelinsky (Sodowsky)
Department of Ocean Sciences, RSMAS
(one-hour MPO student seminar)

Apr 17: Jianhao Zhang
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, RSMAS
(one-hour MPO student seminar)

Apr 24: RESERVED (OCE Invited Speaker)